Osaka Castle

The most famous attraction of Osaka is the castle, which stands in a huge park. The actual castle is surrounded by a wide outer moat and a small inner moat. Behind the first moat, mighty ramparts of large boulders rise up. Through gates you reach the inner area of ​​the fortress. Here you are in front of the second moat, behind which again rise high walls. A bridge leads to the core of the castle complex. Now you are standing in front of the castle of the Shogun, which is protected at the base again by mighty boulders. The upper part of the castle was built of wood.

The castle of Osaka was built in 1583 by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, who was one of the three empires in the history of Japan. As early as 1615, the castle was conquered and destroyed by Ieyasu Tokugawa. The Tokugawa dynasty had the castle rebuilt, but the wooden tower burned down after a strike in 1665. In 1843, the castle was rebuilt to be destroyed again in 1868 in the war for the Meiji restoration. Around 1930, the castle was rebuilt and was destroyed again in World War II. Finally, in 1997, the Osaka Castle was rebuilt from concrete, but looks like its historic predecessors from the outside.

The castle now houses a museum on the history of the castle, and the top floor has an all-round lookout that overlooks all of Osaka.

 

 

Osaka Castle

 

Shitenno-ji Temple

The Shitenno-ji is one of the oldest Buddhist temples in Osaka, it was built as early as 593. The name Shitenno means "The Four Heavenly Kings". Each king has its own color and stands for a direction. Together they protect the kingdom. The temple complex was created after the pattern of Chinese temples. The buildings were made of wood and kept burning. In 1960 the most important buildings were built of concrete. The Shitenno-ji consists of numerous historic buildings. Especially worth seeing is the 5-storey pagoda. The Shitenno-ji is the most beautiful temple in Osaka.

 

Shitenno-ji

 

Dotonbori

Osake city center is located between Osaka-Namba and Nipponbashi subway stations. Parallel to the river Dotonbori also runs the same shopping street. In the Dotonbori pedestrian area you will find many restaurants that draw attention to themselves with imaginative neon signs. The hustle and bustle on the Dotonbori is borderline, but just belongs.

The Dotonbori district became the theater district of Osaka under the Tokugawa Shogunate in 1621. The name comes from the entrepreneur Doton, who had the channel (Japanese hori) 1612 raised.

 

 

Dotonbori

 

Dotonbori River

At the Dotonbori River, the towering LED screens are reflected in the water. The Glico Sign has even made it to a well-known attraction in Japan from Osaka. The sprinter raises his arms as he reaches the finish. The Glico Sprinter was set up in 1935 for the first time and since then renewed again and again. Many Japanese tourists are photographed in front of the Glico Sprinter, raising their arms in the air. Glico is a confectionery manufacturer from Osaka.

 

Dotonbori River

 

Osaka River Cruise

Excursion boats sail on the Dotonbori River. Especially at night, the boat trip is a very popular tourist attraction of Osaka. The jetty is located on the Ebisu bridge. The approximately 20 minute drive is not really worth it, as the route is quite short, you can also walk along the shore for free. The ride costs around ¥ 900 for adults (price 2019). There are also larger tours that once circumnavigate the center of Osaka.

 

Dotonbori River

www.ipponmatsu.co.jp/cruise/tombori.html

 

Don Quijote Ferris Wheel

Another tourist attraction in Osaka is the Ferris wheel of Don Quixote. The construction is unusual, plexiglass ball looping along a steel structure. The ball constantly adjusts to ensure that passengers always sit straight. The view is breathtaking but the construction does not seem very trustworthy and the air in the Platikkugel was a bit stuffy. You get a lot higher than it looks from below, the view over Osaka is great for that. Don Quixote is a billo department store with knickknack up to the ceiling. On the way out you have to walk several floors. A very Japanese experience.

 

Don Quijote

 

 

Tsutenkaku Tower

The 103m high Tsutenkaku Tower has long been the landmark of Osaka. The Tsutenkaku was built in 1912 as a 64 m high tower in the Naniwa district. In 1943 the tower burned down and was rebuilt again in 1956. The viewing platform was one of the attractions of Osaka. Today, there are significantly higher towers in the city. The Tsutenkaku Tower stands over a street in a nightlife district with many restaurants. For this reason, the visit to the tower can be worthwhile.

 

Tsutenkaku Tower

www.tsutenkaku.co.jp

 

Abeno Harukas Tower

Osaka's highest observation deck is the Abeno Harukas skyscraper at Tennoji ring-road station. The 300-meter-high tower at Abenobashi Station has been Japan's tallest skyscraper since 2014. At the top of the skyscraper there is a place under the open sky with a cafe. High glass walls protect the place from strong winds. On the lower floors of the 59-storey office tower is a shopping center.

 

Abeno Harukas

www.abenoharukas-300.jp/en/

 

Umeda Sky Building

The Umeda Sky Building is an extraordinary tower block made up of two towers connected at the top. This square connection level has in the middle of a huge hole in the two inclined escalators leading to the observation deck. You drive up through this tunnel of glass and steel, looking down. A very spectacular design and nothing for people with a fear of heights. The Umeda Syk Building was opened in 1993 and designed by architect Hiroshi Hara. The skyscraper is 173 meters high and is located near the railway station of Osaka. The Umeda Sky Building has a great view of the center of Osaka and the Yodo River.  

 

Umeda Sky Building

 

Map Osaka Attractions

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